Fork revalve - Page 5 - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #81 of 84 (permalink) Old 04-08-2014, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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"Tomla, you mentioned that you raised your fork legs in the 3x clamps. I've heard that improves turn in handling. Could you elaborate a bit on what drove your decision to raise the legs up?"

In general, raising the rear corrects for running wide in the 2nd half of the turn. lowering the front makes initial turn-in easier.

whangler, don't waste your time just doing an oil change if you're going to do the revalve anyway. It's not that much more work and provides 100x the improvement.
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post #82 of 84 (permalink) Old 03-28-2017, 09:49 AM
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Just done my front fork shim-stack

The OEM shim-stack setup in my V was as follows

Air Gap - Right / Left fork = 75mm / 65mm

Kawasaki recommended fork oil is SHOWA SS-8, which has a cST@40 of 36.8
The stock Shim Stack had the following compression shims fitted in this order:

17mm x 0.12mm
17mm x 0.12mm
17mm x 0.12mm
17mm x 0.12mm
09mm x 0.15mm - pivoting shim.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.


My modified Setup is as now:

Air Gap - Right / Left fork = 120mm / 110mm.
Fork oil that has a cST@40 in the range of 28 to 30.
E.g. a 30/70 mix of Motul light and Motul medium will make fork oil with a cST@40 of 29
PS - I weigh no more than 110 kg / 240 lbs in all my motorcycle gear.
The Shim-stack was reassembled in the following order

17mm x 0.12mm - unmodified shim.
09mm x 0.15mm - moved here, to let the top/initial shim flex more.
16mm x 0.12mm - made from stock shim ground down.
15mm x 0.12mm - made from stock shim ground down.
14mm x 0.12mm - made from stock shim ground down.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.
11mm x 0.40mm - stock clamping washer.

To modify the standard 17mm shims, I mounted them individually on an Allen head bolt, put it in a drill chuck and mounted the drill in the jaws of a workmate.
Set the speed to slow(ish) and leant a medium-fine grade file gently on the edge of each shim until was the required diameter.

The 3 holes in the valve that let oil through onto the shim-stack also were also slightly enlarged with a dremel so that they +25% / and valve unit polished. PS - Make sure that you do not enlarge the hole too much / get rid of any of the sealing face as you will then have an unintended bypass oil way and the shim-stack will not work / seal properly.


Before on the STD preload and rebound dampening setting, when going over sharp ridges, bumps and small potholes, especially a combination of these in quick succession at any speed, the STD fork shim-stack setup would feel very hash, as the compression stack was hydraulically locking up.
It also felt to me that this OEM setup caused the front tyre carcass to flex more than it should and make the tyre bounce up and down, causing you to loose grip momentarily on the road surface making me back off in speed. No adjustment of the rebound dampening and the preload would mask / get rid of this at all.


Results

Now, with the modified shim-stack the fork preload and rebound dampening still on the STD settings, (I may play around with these but so far I have not needed to adjust them yet), the harshness is all gone.

Sharp ridges, bumps and small potholes, especially a combination of these in quick succession are now not a worry and the front wheel now feels glued to the road / has a great feedback.

So much so, I was actively looking for previously known bad roads / bends over the w/e, to see if I could upset / induce harshness / hydraulically locking.

However, this setup now works so well I found that I was travelling through corners what seemed to be to me of up to 10 to +15 mph faster than before, without any problems I was now enjoying the ride everywhere.

Is this a mod that I would recommend every Mk1 & 2 Versys owner should consider doing??

HELL YES.

Just do it.

Richard
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post #83 of 84 (permalink) Old 04-03-2017, 10:20 AM
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Interesting that you doubled the air gap in the forks. Did you go with a stiffer spring or anything? An increase in the air gap will generally soften the compression as you approach bottom of the stroke but at the expense of bottoming resistance. I am not sure its an issue with the V forks, just curious as at 240 lbs on stock springs I could imagine them bottoming if worked hard. I really need to do this as well - the stock for action sucks.

Keep it rubber side down and enjoy the ride
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post #84 of 84 (permalink) Old 04-03-2017, 12:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomla View Post
"Tomla, you mentioned that you raised your fork legs in the 3x clamps. I've heard that improves turn in handling. Could you elaborate a bit on what drove your decision to raise the legs up?"

In general, raising the rear corrects for running wide in the 2nd half of the turn. lowering the front makes initial turn-in easier.

whangler, don't waste your time just doing an oil change if you're going to do the revalve anyway. It's not that much more work and provides 100x the improvement.
I would imagine lowering the front does the exact same thing as raising the rear. That is it changes the fork angle which in turn reduces trail making for quicker/lighter steering but less stability/self correcting in steering. More weight on the front will either reduce understeer or increase oversteer. Understeer is when the front slides or gives out before the rear, oversteer is the reverse. Compared to say a WeeStrom I find the front on the Versys feels a bit light and numb in turns. Not sure if what to do to correct this.


Last edited by twowheels; 04-03-2017 at 12:29 PM.
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