Just checking to be sure I don't get into trouble - Kawasaki Versys Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
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Just checking to be sure I don't get into trouble

After I installed a new Shinko 705 rear tire, it raised the back end of the bike so much that I'm up on my tippy-toes.

I decided to raise the forks in the triple clamps to drop the front end a little.

My bike already had the forks about 10 mm above being flush with the triple clamp, is this standard? Anyway, I raised the forks another 20mm up to a total of 30 mm above the triple clamp.

This isn't going to cause any trouble with bottoming out the forks or anything is it?

Just checking, Thanks!

Paul Streeter
Minnesota
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 10:57 AM
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I can't give you an absolute answer but I would highly suggest you make small changes and test. Bottoming is a consideration but also the impact on handling has seen more than one rider make a change and get a surprise on their first tip in to a turn.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 11:29 AM
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If the tire is larger around it maybe like putting a 44T or 43T sproc on. Maybe not a bad thing?

I do not know about the other adjustments you have done.

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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 12:58 PM
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The oversized tire is changing the rake of the steering head. It steepens it and makes the bike turn in faster.
If you raise the forks in the triple clamps, you're steepening it even further.
The bike will turn in even faster. You also loose stability as the rake steepens.

I wouldn't raise the forks. I would lower them to compensate for the bigger rear tire. If you can't touch the ground, just lean the bike to the left when stopping.
Don't set the bike according to being stopped. You need to set the bike up for RIDING IT.

If you start adjusting the geometry without knowing what your doing, you could cause it to be dangerous to ride under certain conditions.

I can't understand why you want to set the bike up for a STOPPED condition.

Just keep your right foot on the brake pedal and lean to the left when stopping. It's how you should ride a bike anyways. I use to use a stand to ride my dirtbike when I was little because I could reach the ground on it. I was about 12 inches to short, but I rode it and learned how to stop and take off without relying on the box as I grew into the bike. Ever watch the police exhibitions ? They never take the right foot off the brake pedal and only use the left foot to hold the bike up while stopped. It's the proper way to ride and will help with being vertically challenged
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 01:35 PM
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Streeter, drdiesel1
I have a 29" inseam and have experience with riding when my feet can't touch down flat. Experienced riders have long ridden as drdiesel1 suggests, and don't understand the problem. However, inexperienced riders will have many drops, mostly when stopped, when they can't reach the ground with feet flat. It's at best depressing.

If the problem started with the new tire, I suggest you replace that tire with one that's made for the bike and does what you need. There are many good tires, and lots of experience with them documented here on the web.

With the right tires on your bike, if you then need to lower further, use one of the methods that have already been tried successfully: Speedy's lowering kit; HyperPro lowering progresssive-springs (front and rear); raising forks; etc.

My opinion based on my experience. Good luck!
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 03:27 PM
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Bike is definitely going to have a sportier feel to it. It will want to fall into the turns and high speed stability will be affected.

If you are determined to keep the tire I would lower the rear end of the bike to compensate. Set the rear shock stiffer to help keep from bottoming out.

Good luck.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 05:15 PM
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Take some tools with you and go for a blast up the highway to see if you lost any stability. You may have and will want to restore the forks back to where they were. It's easiest to loosen and slide one fork a little bit at a time. Let us know how the bike has been effected.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 07:32 PM
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By raising the rear and/or lowering the front, you are reducing the trail. This will cause the bike to turn in quicker, but overdone will cause a tank slapper. This is not good. With original tires, I find that mine wants to shake its head when I get the front end light on a 1-2 shift. I can only imagine what yours is like. Get a Speedy lowering kit and follow his instructions.

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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-25-2012, 11:25 PM
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Is it a Shinko 705 150/70? The height increase wasn't so extreme. You were already a bit high to start with... You could upgrade to Hyperpro's progressive lowering spring for a 30mm (1 3/16") lowered seat height.

About $140 shipped in USA from: http://epmperf.com/lowering-links.htm

http://aviciouscycle.ca/mainpages/pr...productid=3539

Last edited by invader; 10-26-2012 at 12:00 AM.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 05:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Streeter View Post
After I installed a new Shinko 705 rear tire, it raised the back end of the bike so much that I'm up on my tippy-toes.

I decided to raise the forks in the triple clamps to drop the front end a little.

My bike already had the forks about 10 mm above being flush with the triple clamp, is this standard? Anyway, I raised the forks another 20mm up to a total of 30 mm above the triple clamp.

This isn't going to cause any trouble with bottoming out the forks or anything is it?

Just checking, Thanks!

Paul Streeter
Minnesota
I would NOT do what you did, for the reasons the others have stated.

Ed

My KLR trip to Alaska, YT, NWT and BC in summer 2009
http://www.klr650.net/forums/showthread.php?t=69383

My Versys trip to D2D 2013, and Alaska, June '13
http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums...ad.php?t=33153

My Versys trip to D2D 2015, and Inuvik, June '15
http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums...ad.php?t=83034
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-13-2012, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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1500 mile report on my set-up

I wrote the first posting and described my set-up, contrary to popular opinion, I did not crash "The reports of my death were greatly exaggerated" (Mark Twain).

I put on about 100 miles commuting to work and back, then loaded the Versys on a trailer and hauled it to the Texas / Mexico border. I put on 1400 miles last week in Mexico. I think it was a good test, lots of varied conditions. Rough roads with bumps, potholes and broken pavement, hundreds of topes (speed bumps), curvy roads, max of about 90 mph, and some light gravel. No speed wobbles, no in-stability. It was loaded down with saddlebags and a tank bag packed for a week's travel (plus me at 265 pounds in my birthday suit, plus XXL riding gear and boots).

I am an experienced rider, having ridden for over 40 years and owned about 40 bikes, I own 4 now. I have made similar modifications in the past to my KLR and DRZ.

I appreciate your concerns and did not do this set-up thoughtlessly. My main concern was in bottoming clearance. I don't think I bottomed the forks, but they got a good work-out. Riding in Mexico, we usually use the speed bumps as passing opportunities. The cars and trucks slow down, we gas it and go over the speed bumps at 40 - 50 mph. It's easy to pass 4 or 5 cars and trucks at a time.

Paul Streeter
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-13-2012, 11:50 PM
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Raising or lowering the forks will have no effect on whether it bottoms out or not of you didn't changes the springs, preload and or valving in the forks. As others have stated raising the rear and lowering the front will change the geometry.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2012, 02:47 AM
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Lowering the triple clamps on the forks excessively can cause the fender to bottom out on bottom of lower clamp.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-14-2012, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invader View Post
Lowering the triple clamps on the forks excessively can cause the fender to bottom out on bottom of lower clamp.
You can only go so far and then the the diameter is smaller. Mine's down as far as possible and I've never had a problem with that.

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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-15-2012, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Streeter View Post
I wrote the first posting and described my set-up, contrary to popular opinion, I did not crash "The reports of my death were greatly exaggerated" (Mark Twain).

I put on about 100 miles commuting to work and back, then loaded the Versys on a trailer and hauled it to the Texas / Mexico border. I put on 1400 miles last week in Mexico. I think it was a good test, lots of varied conditions. Rough roads with bumps, potholes and broken pavement, hundreds of topes (speed bumps), curvy roads, max of about 90 mph, and some light gravel. No speed wobbles, no in-stability. It was loaded down with saddlebags and a tank bag packed for a week's travel (plus me at 265 pounds in my birthday suit, plus XXL riding gear and boots).

I am an experienced rider, having ridden for over 40 years and owned about 40 bikes, I own 4 now. I have made similar modifications in the past to my KLR and DRZ.

I appreciate your concerns and did not do this set-up thoughtlessly. My main concern was in bottoming clearance. I don't think I bottomed the forks, but they got a good work-out. Riding in Mexico, we usually use the speed bumps as passing opportunities. The cars and trucks slow down, we gas it and go over the speed bumps at 40 - 50 mph. It's easy to pass 4 or 5 cars and trucks at a time.

Paul Streeter
Sounds like an awesome trip.Any trouble in Mexico?We hear a lot of bad and not much good here in n.Texas about going into the border areas at least.Glad the bike did well for you.Share some pics and Old Mexico stories if you get the chance.Don
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by joshuarider View Post
Sounds like an awesome trip.Any trouble in Mexico?We hear a lot of bad and not much good here in n.Texas about going into the border areas at least.Glad the bike did well for you.Share some pics and Old Mexico stories if you get the chance.Don
It was a great trip. No trouble in Mexico at all. We saw lots of army checkpoints and a few Policia Federales checkpoints, but no hint of violence. We did get away from the border as quickly as possible and purposely stayed 200 miles away on our last night. I'm not much of a photographer, but I'll try to write up a trip report and post it.

Paul
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