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post #21 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-07-2010, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by alex182 View Post
Yeah, no off-road for me really, but the groovy pavement makes me a bit nervous and that's what I want to deal with. I don't mind having to put a little extra work into turning, I'm 300lb and have a lot of oomph to throw the bike around.

If not the Anakee-II's, what would the Hive Mind reccomend for wet/dry grooved and tar-snakey pavement with little to none off-road?
Hopefully we'll get some riders that have used a tire in a similar capacity that can give first had knowledge/experience for a specific tire.

Each manufacturer has a sport touring type tire that would work for your application. I would stick with the standard tire sizes specified for the bike. That will give you the most reliable handling and performance. The anakee2's you mention come on the GS and strom dual sport bikes. The versys was designed for a different performance envelope and tires specified to suit. For your application I highly recommend not deviating from the factory sizes and tire types.

From your description of mostly super-slab travel I would be looking for a high-mileage rated tire with a wet-pavement tread target, even a dual compound tire with a harder crown to help prevent wearing a flat spot across the tread. The softer compound sportbike type tires, while sticky for hard cornering, also tend to wear quickly in the center if used extensivly for super-slab (what we call lots of freeway riding with little hard cornering at steep lean angles).

It doesn't sound like you do your own tire changing so my suggestion would be to look to a dealer or two that your are confident with and see what they offer and recommend. They'll give you a package deal for a new set, mounted and balanced.

I grew up in the NW, lived and worked in Kirkland for many years. You must be riding to the south end or into Seattle every day. The rain and the freeways are a nightmare up there.

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post #22 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-07-2010, 11:26 AM
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Yup, into west Seattle every day. The I-90 exchanges are all messed up, even though construction is "done" on them. Ok, I'll check with the dealership and a couple shops to see what they have. One thing I've always wondered though is why are "all-weather" tires made with only 1/8" of tread? Riding in the rain you regularly hit water that is deeper than that. Wierd...
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post #23 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-07-2010, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by alex182 View Post
>snip
...why are "all-weather" tires made with only 1/8" of tread? Riding in the rain you regularly hit water that is deeper than that. Wierd...
LOL, yeah, motorcycle tires are certainly different from auto tires. Car tires don't get leaned over to hard angles.

For rain grip the rubber compound is supplanted with a high silica compound to make it bite into the pavement even when wet. And the grooves are shaped and situated to channel water away from the center of the tire as it rolls. They are not designed for high speed over standing water. Some have more grooves, some are wider and deeper. Tread depth is shallow to keep the tread surface rigid so you don't experience the squirminess you mention previously. Front tire tread depth is generally about 70% of rear, same reason, so the front maintains its planted feel, plus the rear get hard accelleration and hard stops, carries most of the weight, so it will tend to wear faster.

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post #24 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-07-2010, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by CJBROWN View Post
I ran Avon Distanzias, and got about 8K miles from the rear, , and got about 15 k from the front (from Miguelito)

I'm not clear if this was a versys or not, and no indication if this was the dualsport compound or the sumo compound. If the latter would make it a first choice for my use.
1st: Original OEM Dunlop tires...>snip
They were run on a Versys, but I have no idea what compound they were. Have another Distanzia on the front now, and a Metzler Tourance on the rear. I suspect my mileage may not be as great this time, as I'm doing a lot of 2-up riding. I like the way the Tourance is wearing, as even with 6k miles on it, (and almost alll of that riding 2-up), it looks pretty good. pic attached.

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post #25 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-07-2010, 11:13 PM
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A good thread on road tires here:

Best all round road tyres for 2010

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post #26 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-08-2010, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by CJBROWN View Post
Here is some pretty good feedback on them, just not versys feedback.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=611991
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=601978
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=613008
http://www.st-owners.com/forums/showthread.php?t=82860

Some have said it's a pretty heavy duty tire, popular on bigger bikes. But they have a neutral profile for neutral turn in.

Seem like a good price for a dual compound sport touring tire from a reputable company. I don't think you could go wrong.


EDIT: I see there is a 'GT' version, heavier carcass for heavier bikes. The standard should perform well on the Versys.
Thanks, CJ. This winter the V will see the 023's.
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post #27 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 10:52 AM
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A couple of other threads with valuable information:

On tire pressures:
Versys Tyre pressures, a Guide FWIW

On best road tires:
Best all round road tyres for 2010

On Shinko road tires:
Resonable priced tires

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post #28 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 01:09 PM
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I just removed a SHINKO E-705 Trail Master from my KLR because the 'knobs' (at least 12 of the 17 on the left side of center on the rear) were in a state of incipient tread separation, with about 4200 miles on it (at 42 PSI). A buddy with a GS1200 had several TOTALLY separate off his rear. I won't use the 705 again, or recommend it. (And don't forget - the KLR has significantly LESS HP than the V!)
What I understand from the Shinko 705 thread on ADV is that this is typical for the bias ply 705's.
Those are now replaced at retailers by the radial 705, which does not seem to shed its blocks.
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post #29 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 02:26 PM
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What I understand from the Shinko 705 thread on ADV is that this is typical for the bias ply 705's.
Those are now replaced at retailers by the radial 705, which does not seem to shed its blocks.
Yes, there were several accounts for the bias-ply. Not one, yet anyway, for radials. I put about 3000km on them, and thus far there's no wear showing, and traction is much better than Distanzia or Tourance.

As far as I know nobody has any bias in stock, there was quite a bit of wait for 150s and 120s.

Edited to add these pics- the one on left is Miguelito's Tourance, the one on right is my 705

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post #30 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 04:34 PM
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>snip
... and traction is much better than Distanzia or Tourance.
>snip
On or off pavement, or both?
What about wet pavement?
Loaded or light?
You ran both tires before the shinkos? on the rear or with a rear on the front?
You have a 120/90 on the front?

In your pics chickens are zero, so it looks like you're riding past the edge of the tire. What's your front look like?


BTW, Jake tried the TKC 130/80 on the front and same deal, you end up riding past the edge of the tire as the profile is so flat.

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post #31 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-22-2010, 06:23 PM
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On or off pavement, or both?
What about wet pavement?
Loaded or light?
You ran both tires before the shinkos? on the rear or with a rear on the front?
You have a 120/90 on the front?

In your pics chickens are zero, so it looks like you're riding past the edge of the tire. What's your front look like?


BTW, Jake tried the TKC 130/80 on the front and same deal, you end up riding past the edge of the tire as the profile is so flat.
I'd say that between Distanzia SM, Tourance, and Trail Attack, the TA is best in rain. Loaded it was hard to lock the rear on tarmac.

With the above tires I had Distanzia SM on front, 120/70- went through them like butter. They work, but they're expensive.

On wet Tourances seem to have a bit of an edge over Shinko. BUT I got the Shinko recently, after the temps got colder, so it's not a fair comparison. I didn't run the Distanzia in rain, or if I did I don't remember.

Yes, I do have a 120/90 Shinko on front now, and no, the profile is anything but flat. Not having chicken strips is not related to running past tire's edge- although yes, it requires a bit less lean to get there with 150s. But, I didn't have chicken strips on the 160 stock either You'd have to ask Miguelito about his lack of chicken strips...

I don't have a side pic of the 120/90, but even here it doesn't look flat to me...

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post #32 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 12:54 PM
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I'd say that between Distanzia SM, Tourance, and Trail Attack, the TA is best in rain. Loaded it was hard to lock the rear on tarmac.

With the above tires I had Distanzia SM on front, 120/70- went through them like butter. They work, but they're expensive.

On wet Tourances seem to have a bit of an edge over Shinko. BUT I got the Shinko recently, after the temps got colder, so it's not a fair comparison. I didn't run the Distanzia in rain, or if I did I don't remember.

Yes, I do have a 120/90 Shinko on front now, and no, the profile is anything but flat. Not having chicken strips is not related to running past tire's edge- although yes, it requires a bit less lean to get there with 150s. But, I didn't have chicken strips on the 160 stock either You'd have to ask Miguelito about his lack of chicken strips...

I don't have a side pic of the 120/90, but even here it doesn't look flat to me...

Allriding, it looks like you have to raise the front fender with the Shinko 120/90 Yes?
Im trying to figure out a set up where I dont have to raise the fender but Im liking the looks of the Shinko for off road. Someone help me! I need new tires soon.

thanks, Donn
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post #33 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 04:08 PM
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Allriding, it looks like you have to raise the front fender with the Shinko 120/90 Yes?
Im trying to figure out a set up where I dont have to raise the fender but Im liking the looks of the Shinko for off road. Someone help me! I need new tires soon.

thanks, Donn
Yes, you need to raise the fender with Shinko. But why the reticence in doing this? It's only $5, plus some of your time. The forks won't be affected by this, on my bike the fork travel stops 7/8" from the bottom. Keep in mind that Shinko 705s are getting pretty close to a knobbie diameter wise.

However, a Distanzia SM or Pirreli doesn't require you to raise the front, and you could use whatever you want on rear- either stock size or 150. I'd suggest 150 for better selection/profile. If you go with a 705 on rear and Distanzia SM on front, the rake will be increased, don't know by how much, and doubt that will make much of a difference off pavement. On pavement it should compensate for somewhat slower turning tires.

cheers
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post #34 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-23-2010, 10:44 PM
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Yes, you need to raise the fender with Shinko. But why the reticence in doing this? It's only $5, plus some of your time. The forks won't be affected by this, on my bike the fork travel stops 7/8" from the bottom. Keep in mind that Shinko 705s are getting pretty close to a knobbie diameter wise.

However, a Distanzia SM or Pirreli doesn't require you to raise the front, and you could use whatever you want on rear- either stock size or 150. I'd suggest 150 for better selection/profile. If you go with a 705 on rear and Distanzia SM on front, the rake will be increased, don't know by how much, and doubt that will make much of a difference off pavement. On pavement it should compensate for somewhat slower turning tires.

cheers
Thanks for the input. Oh yeah and GO! GIANTS! WOOHOO! Your right about the fender I could machine up some nice brackets at no cost to me is there anything else I should know?

Donn
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post #35 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 11:22 AM
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Just checked a tire web site and the Shinko 705 120/90 is a Tube Type tire and they do not show a Tubless type in this size. What to do now??
thank again, great thread. Donn
http://www.tireexpress.com/prod.cfm/cid/9001/pid/28263
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post #36 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 03:41 PM
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Just cheched a tire web site and the Shinko 705 120/90 is a Tube Type tire and they do not show a Tubless type in this size. What to do now??

OH NO, I've been running a tube tire tubeless

I am no tire expert, but based on my research of this issue, many people did this, tires are certified tube or 'less based on some arbitrary decisions, etc. Rear tires are not to be installed on front say some, others say you could. Shinko advertises some of their tires as front/back- heresy It's your decision if you go one way or the other, all I'm saying is that it's been done and it works without any adverse issue. The 130 is tubeless, but is fatter and heavier.

Considering the fender, I opted not to install a direct brake line, because I will sell this bike next year, most likely, but also because I don't see the point- brakes are great the way they are, with different pads. The over line is removed from it's plastic thingy in order to allow me to move the fender up as much as possible. I have a Fenda Extender or whatever's called, and that being installed underneath the fender takes some space. I forgot how much I raised it, probably around 2-2.5".
One more thing, if you can machine some nice brackets, you might consider paying back to this forum by offering them to other people,for a decent price.

cheers
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post #37 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-24-2010, 04:05 PM
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awesome, thanks so much. I want to go with this set up. would love to give back to the Forum anyway I can. Ive been racing and riding for over 40 years and still I'm no expert, still learning everyday, most of my post/threads hear have been to help one out or to make one laugh, Never too serious here, Never!
This Forum Rocks!
Thanks again! Donn
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post #38 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-29-2010, 01:55 PM
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I read through most of the post on ADV for the Shinko 705 and what Ive learned is the front 705 direction arrow for the tire is in the opposite direction from the rear so if I put a rear on the front I will run it in the opposite direction. Another thing mentioned on the ADV site was using the tube type tire in tubeless wheels and buying tubes. Are tubes needed if running tube type tires in a tubeless wheel? allriding is running a tube type 705 tubeless. Just answered my own question.
I found this stuff called (TyreGuardian Puncture Protection System) on ADV and plan to use it when I mount my Shinko's
Here's the link:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=596213

Donn
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post #39 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-29-2010, 02:16 PM
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I read through most of the post on ADV for the Shinko 705 and what Ive learned is the front 705 direction arrow for the tire is in the opposite direction from the rear so if I put a rear on the front I will run it in the opposite direction. Another thing mentioned on the ADV site was using the tube type tire in tubeless wheels and buying tubes. Are tubes needed if running tube type tires in a tubeless wheel? I didn't see that mentioned here on this thread.
JDROCKS among others recommend running the tire in the direction of the arrow, front or rear, as the grooves are oriented to disapate water as you roll forward. Mounting them in reverse could lead to hydroplaning in standing water at speed.

I'm no tire expert on construction, but my understanding is that a tubeless tire has a different bead, but I could be way off base. It has been generally accepted that you can put a tube in a tubeless tire, a tube in a tube-type tire, but not without a tube in a tube type tire. But yes, some have done it. The question then becomes, if the tire gets low on air will it break the bead in motion? Offroad tires on jeeps and four-by's will do that. Another consideration is that the maximum rim width for the 120/90 tire is 3", the versys front is 3.5. This will also increase the chance that the bead can pop, plus it further flattens out the profie of the tread when you pull the sides out. Is half an inch a big deal? I dunno, I'm just sayin' - these are all considerations and concerns.

A tube also creates and traps extra heat compared to a tubeless. Something to consider if you're going to run hard on a Versys. That's why they put Z-rated tires on them. Just something to watch out for.

Also, a tube-type tire has a different belt construction than a radial. And the generally have a stiffer sidewall and a less stiff tread, so the tire will roll over easier than a radial. Another thing to consider if you ride aggressively on the road.

My take for any of these substitute tires is to keep your speeds under 70 and go easy in the corners. There simply is no way they're going to grip on road like a sport-touring road tire of the proper size.

I would hate for someone to tread their bike with unknown or risky tire combos and then go out and slide their bike off the road, or worse, be injured in a crash. Again, I'm just sayin'. There is no way that this forum or any of its members can be responsible for what individuals decide to do with their bikes. Just a general disclaimer here.

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post #40 of 196 (permalink) Old 10-29-2010, 02:32 PM
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JDROCKS among others recommend running the tire in the direction of the arrow, front or rear, as the grooves are oriented to disapate water as you roll forward. Mounting them in reverse could lead to hydroplaning in standing water at speed.

I'm no tire expert on construction, but my understanding is that a tubeless tire has a different bead, but I could be way off base. It has been generally accepted that you can put a tube in a tubeless tire, a tube in a tube-type tire, but not without a tube in a tube type tire. But yes, some have done it. The question then becomes, if the tire gets low on air will it break the bead in motion? Offroad tires on jeeps and four-by's will do that. Another consideration is that the maximum rim width for the 120/90 tire is 3", the versys front is 3.5. This will also increase the chance that the bead can pop, plus it further flattens out the profie of the tread when you pull the sides out. Is half an inch a big deal? I dunno, I'm just sayin' - these are all considerations and concerns.

A tube also creates and traps extra heat compared to a tubeless. Something to consider if you're going to run hard on a Versys. That's why they put Z-rated tires on them. Just something to watch out for.

Also, a tube-type tire has a different belt construction than a radial. And the generally have a stiffer sidewall and a less stiff tread, so the tire will roll over easier than a radial. Another thing to consider if you ride aggressively on the road.

My take for any of these substitute tires is to keep your speeds under 70 and go easy in the corners. There simply is no way they're going to grip on road like a sport-touring road tire of the proper size.

I would hate for someone to tread their bike with unknown or risky tire combos and then go out and slide their bike off the road, or worse, be injured in a crash. Again, I'm just sayin'. There is no way that this forum or any of its members can be responsible for what individuals decide to do with their bikes. Just a general disclaimer here.
Ok, good stuff, anybody want to chim in on this. I want to here more on this one. the manufacture of this tire wants you to mount the front in the opposite direction of the rear and there's some good points as to why you should on the ADV site. allriding is running a rear tube type on the front 120/90/17 with no problem with the width of the rim, no tube and seems to be doing fine with it running it in same direction as the rear too.

Donn
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